Sleep staging in adults using mandibular movements signal: clinical validation

Sleep staging in adults using mandibular movements signal: clinical validation

 

We published in 2021 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine an article about sleep staging of patients suffering from OSA (Obstructive Sleep Apnea) with a sensor recording mandibular movements. 

By Julianne Thimoléon

Context


This study was conducted by Nhat-Nam Le-Dong, Jean-Benoit Martinot, Nathalie Coumans, Valérie Cuthbert, Renaud Tamisier, Sébastien Bailly, and Jean-Louis Pépin


We all sleep, and sleep patterns and architecture influence our health and wellbeing. At present, the gold standard method for recording detailed sleep patterns to detect and monitor sleep disorders is in-laboratory overnight polysomnography (PSG), requiring specialized equipment and trained staff. This is no longer feasible in view of the size of the population with suspected sleep disorders, and especially in the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) era. 


Our objective was to develop, train, and evaluate the accuracy of mandibular automatic analysis for sleep staging in sleep apnea patients.

 

Study Design 


The prospective monocentric study was conducted on a group of 1,026 adults with suspected OSA referred for overnight in-laboratory PSG and simultaneous recordings of mandibular movements using the Sunrise system. 


The PSG data were manually scored by two experienced sleep technicians. The data collected by Sunrise system were directly scored the algorithm trained. 

 

 

 

Conclusion

The study concludes that mandibular movements acquired by Sunrise are suitable for automated sleep staging in adults presenting a broad spectrum of OSA severity. 

Read the whole scientific paper in this page

 

 

A few words about the Journal 

The American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine publishes high-quality original papers, reviews, and clinical trials in respiratory, critical care, and sleep medicine to foster advances in translational research and clinical practice.

Related articles